Animal Crossing: Candy Cane Addiction

  • The first few holiday items went quick, and doing the ones with CC (Candy Cane) rewards in the Timed Goals, they're free or even generate a profit. The rest are a little pricey. Every day between the quarry and a few rounds of animal requests I make about 100 CC, so I should have all the holiday items by the 6th. Someone playing more casually should still get there by the end of the month.

  • Feature requests filed with Nintendo (More->Misc->Customer Support->Feedback): Market Box Search: Search all friends' market boxes for a specific item, and see a list sorted by unit price ascending. Sort Inventory: A button to sort clothes and furnishings A-Z instead of date-added. Breezy Hollow, the orchard area, has no reason to revisit it except when fruit resets every 3 hours. The other 3 harvest areas all have 2 fruit trees and fish/bugs, so Breezy Hollow should have 2 bug spots. Who knows if some English feature requests are even going to make it to the dev staff, but better than just complaining to the blog.

  • I've been thinking about the need for chat. It'd be nice to give feedback on camps beyond a Kudo (which for the daily goals is often just "first in the friend list"). Ideally we could just see our friends' Miitomo accounts and go chat there, it's been dead quiet for a year.
    But then I think of Nintendo's Disney-like purity goals and remember Randy Farmer's BlockChat post. So I'm pondering ways to share a URL with items, say with letter/number shirts in the camper.

These animals are crazy:

Beau Picnic

But not always wrong:

Bunnie Blogs

And sometimes full of wisdom:

Tex Coffee

Advent of Code 2017

I've joined the Advent of Code, and I'll be doing it in JS. Got my 2 stars for the day.

For good discipline (or as a handicap), I'm building a halfway-decent set of pages, unit testing framework, and sort of doing things right (good ES6 practices) instead of easy (hack some inline JS in compatibility mode). I'll link it in the sidebar tomorrow, when challenge 1 expires: My Advent of Code

Go on and do it yourself! I say "easy mode is for babies" and make it hard on myself, but really you can do this in anything. There's a perfectly nice Chipmunk BASIC or FreePascal if you're old-school.

Note: The leaderboard reset time is ridiculous, and I don't care about speed-coding or leaderboards. Don't stress about competing for first 100 completions, just do the thing.

RIP Jambox mini

RIP Jambox mini which I have been using for 4 years, 8 hours per night, as my white noise speaker, despite weak power supply and shitty bass. Last year Jawbone stopped software updates. This summer Jawbone went bankrupt. Now it won't even turn on, and they can't replace it.

Animal Crossing: Silent Night Deadly Night Edition


Animal Crossing Xmas

'Tis the season! We've got a fun holiday event planned for you, starting tomorrow, 11/30, at 10:00 p.m. (PST). I can't wait! #PocketCamp

If you want to peek at some of the new presents, Gamepress has a datamine

… Sadly Pocket Camp doesn't have a usable axe, so I can't put on a Santa suit and reenact a holiday movie.

Java EE Abandonware

From the latest Nov/Dec 2017 Java Magazine (viewing of their terrible reader, or downloading a PDF with no bookmarks, only works in Chrome):

In an unexpected and widely applauded move, Oracle announced just before the JavaOne conference this year that it would be moving development of Java EE to the open source community.
This action, efectively unthinkable a few years ago, is being done by giving control of development technologies and of project governance to the Eclipse Foundation. Included in this transition are the full source code of the diferent reference implementations and of the many test suites that ensure conformance and compliance with Java EE speciication requirements.
This migration shows emphatically that Oracle is giving the technology to the community. That is, this move should not be confused with the occasional dumping of technologies to open source foundations by companies no longer interested in supporting them—a phenomenon known as “abandon-ware.”

Spin, spin, spin the Oracle death spiral! But given the state of J2EE, I can't really mourn its impending demise.

I only rarely have to touch Java anymore, and the JavaFX front-end stuff is pretty weird from my old AWT/early Swing perspective, but my old Java games still work, and all the server side and image processing, which are all I use it for now, had been nice and stable.

But look at this nonsense for CDI (Context and Dependency Injection) 2.0 replacing JSF/Spring/Hibernate (which weren't lovely to start with), they want you to use:

public class CdiExtension implements Extension {
    public void afterBean(@Observes AfterBeanDiscovery afterBeanDiscovery) {
            .id("Created by " + CdiExtension.class)
            .createWith(e -> new MyBeanImpl("Hi!"));

The actual work is new MyBeanImpl("Hi!"), which you could do in one line in a startup script/class, without this giant framework. At least with all the XML nonsense in Spring or JSF, you could change it at runtime instead of recompiling the project.